Hot Girls Wanted

Hot_Girls_wanted_movie posterParadoxically, you can almost respect people who are ballsy enough to go out on a limb and do things that most people don’t respect. Almost, but not quite.

Hot Girls Wanted shines its POV soft light on amateur adult film stars, and is a documentary so raw at times, it needs lube. 

Miami, unsurprisingly, the ersatz and cultural black hole that it is, is now home to a nascent amateur scene. The film depicts entrants into a business with a shelf life comparable to actual produce (for most girls, after three months in the business “they’re done”).

It’s not surprising then, when later one of the stars describes herself as a “piece of processed meat.”

Like a supermarket, there’s a seemingly endless variety of products, each pretty much the same. Here, they’re young girls and as Hot Girls Wanted points out in the beginning with a dizzying array of thumbnails, in the supply and demand curve of sexual economics, there’s an endless supply.

And it’s definitely hard to tell these widgets apart.

This is compounded by their names, each interchangeable with one another: Stella May, Brooklyn Daniels, Ava Taylor, Lucy Tyler, Ava Kelly…There’s no Eloisa McGillivray or Babette O’Halloran.

Hot_Girls_WANTEDIt’s difficult to keep them straight, but they’re all Id-driven, uneducated, celeb-obsessed and solipsistic, and it’s hard to tell whether they were like this before going beyond the green door or after.

As Hot Girls Wanted progresses, each girl begins to finally distinguish themselves and we learn about their family lives and significant others whose lives are flipped upside down by their controversial line of work.

At first, they insist their milieu is becoming more accepted by the mainstream, but it really hasn’t: witness the furor surrounding Duke’s Belle Knox. But to their credit, the girls here, despite their lack of formal education, are able to provide more insights into the Ivy League adult film star and the world she inhabits than Knox herself.

Stay with this one and you’ll be rewarded, but it’s not so much a cautionary tale of, well, “a piece of tail”; it’s a human story about life’s choices.

***1/2 (out of 5)

 

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